#44608--Transitional Paleo-- Early Archaic knife

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#44608--Transitional Paleo-- Early Archaic knife

#44608--Transitional Paleo-- Early Archaic knife
#44608--Transitional Paleo-- Early Archaic knife
#44608--Transitional Paleo-- Early Archaic knife
#44608--Transitional Paleo-- Early Archaic knife
#44608--Transitional Paleo-- Early Archaic knife
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Price: $225.00
Status: Available

From what I was told the plow-broken Late Paleo--Early Archaic knife was found in two sections, something like six months apart--one little wedge in the center never to be found. The knife is (for our Harrison County-type Hornstone) extremely long, 6&7/16". This was a Lense (layer) form of hornstone, not a nodular form, easily told as there is virtually no curvature to the blade, tip-to-base. Had the preform been shattered off a flint spall there would have been much more curve to the blade. There were only a few VERY early cultures, principally the Early Ovoid blade makers, who could shatter flint of such length and get a flat preform. Width is only 1" at the tiny hafting area--note that the haft is slightly fluted on one face. The sharpening method along the blade is Quadra-facial, it isn't beveled the way most Early Archaic knives (Cobbs Knives) were sharpened--this is more like Harpeth River points. While those point types do stray into Indiana, it's a considerable distance up the Wabash River in the Vigo--Knox County area where this knife originated. Is it 100% certain that the piece is Early Ovoid Culture--NO, that's my opinion based on length, flint working techniques, and basal form--even if the base isn't cornernotched the was Early Ovoids were.If someone can come up with a better explanation I'll certainly listen. A couple things to note--the tip was modified as a reamer sometime after the original manufacture--FAR darker hornstone showing. This patina difference is definitely not modern, but is definitely not from 10,000 year old drilling; it could be Hopewell or Adena later-period-salvage, which is the best explanation I can offer. The lifetime guarantee I give on anything I sell is conditional on the buyer understanding I'm guaranteeing the piece authentic, but If it (the dark flint showing) bothers you, do NOT buy the piece. If you have a question, please ask it before you enter a purchase request. No additional cost for shipping, and checks or M.O.s each receive day-after-receipt shipping--Roy A.

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